About M-SAMC

The Multi-State Advanced Manufacturing Consortium supports the national development of competency-based education curriculum to meet the needs of the manufacturing industry.

Danville Community College was one of 13 community colleges involved in the TAACCCT federal grant. Learn more at the M-SAMC website.

Faculty Contacts

For more information about Advanced Manufacturing Programs at Danville contact:

Stephen Wray

(434) 797-8592

swray@dcc.vccs.edu

Industry Partners

Goodyear Tire & Rubber

M-SAMC College Partners

View Our Partner Map

  • Alamo Colleges
  • Bluegrass CTC
  • BridgeValley CTC
  • Danville Community College
  • Gadsden State Community College
  • Henry Ford College
  • Jefferson CTC
  • Oakland Community College
  • Pellissippi State Community College
  • Rock Valley College
  • Rhodes State College
  • Spartanburg Community College
  • TCAT - Murfreesboro

The Changing College Curriculum

Stephen Wray, M-SAMC Implementation Facilitator from Danville Community College, discusses offering industry-like labs with flexible schedules and the importance of staffing them with the right personnel.

 

Danville Community College News

While Danville, Virginia saw the addition of about 360 jobs and $3.1 in capital investment during the past year, economic development director, Telly Tucker isn't satisfied. Tucker has high goals for the city and is aiming for further increases over the next 12 months. He shared, "We are currently working with five existing industries that are working through expansion projects, either by jobs or capital investment. They're going to be in the neighborhood of $275 million."

Now in it's second season, TITAN-American Built, takes a look at manufacturing in America and how American manufacturing can compete in a global market. Recently the show visited M-SAMC school, Danville Community College. The show's host and precision machinist, Titan Gilroy, toured the Gene Haas Center for Integrated Machining and spoke with students.

 

Watch now!

The Manufacturing Day survey results are in, and events held around the U.S. have positively impacted the perception of the industry and its career options. Both students and educators are more aware of manufacturing jobs in their communities, and both found events and activities held interesting and engaging. Check out the survey for more results.

For a second year, Danville Community College has been named  to Virginia Living's "Top High Schools and Colleges" list. The editors selected DCC for its expansion of facilities and equipment that enhance student's training in advanced manufacturing.

Under the American Apprenticeship Initiative Danville Community College is one of four colleges receiving $2.9 million in grant funds to develop and implement an apprenticeship-based jobs training program. The grant funds will help the colleges teach advanced manufacturing and information technology career skills to both incumbent workers as well as those new to the workforce.

 

DCC Vice President of Workforce Services Jeff Arnold notes workers can earn a good salary while learning a lifelong trade. He further shares that employers are also benefitting because participants are are acquiring skills necessary to work within the company's culture.

 

Employers or individuals who would like to participate can call DCC at 434-797-8430, or email info@dcc.vccs.edu for more information.

The Danville Community College Educational Foundation has established the Rosalie C. Mead Women in Manufacturing Scholarship to help set-up women for successful careers in advanced manufacturing. Awarded annually, the scholarship is a financial incentive to encourage females to enroll in the Integrated Machining Technology program at the Gene Haas Center for Integrated Machining. The scholarship is also a way to reinvest in the future of the local economy, ensuring growth of industry in the community.

10 Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) centers to receive award from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).  This includes centers in Texas, Michigan, Virginia, and Tennessee.  The MEP centers help small and mid-sized manufacturers create and retain jobs.

The “New Virginia Economy Workforce Initiative” is a plan to better train workers for skilled jobs. It focuses on “middle-skills jobs,” which require some training past high school but not necessarily a four-year degree, and are most in demand in Virginia and elsewhere.

 

Virginia's Governor Terry McAuliffe, who likes to call himself the state’s “chief jobs creation officer,” wants workers to earn "credentials, licenses, apprenticeships and associate degrees" that translate directly to jobs.

 

Andy Van Kleunen, executive director of the nonprofit National Skills Coalition agrees, "It's a smart way to target investments and skills, and it's going to get more people to jobs more quickly."

Mayville Engineering Co. (MEC) expects to add 160 jobs at its new $10 million manufacturing facility in Atkins, VA. Featuring high-tech equipment to manufacture products, MEC will require a skilled workforce to operate and maintain the facility. An open house to showcase the new facility is scheduled for December 3, 2014.

Our emerging economy will provide few high-paying jobs for workers with a high school education or less. To help citizens excel and access a middle-class life or beyond, the National Governors Association has announced support of governors' efforts to align education & training systems to the needs of states economies. Job placement focus is sighted on increasing the number of credential, certificate, and degree completing students.

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Unless otherwise noted this M-SAMC Website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

This workforce solution was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The solution was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.

*AMTEC is supported entirely by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technology Education (ATE) Program Grant (0903193). (AMTEC,NSF ATE DUE-0903193)