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About M-SAMC

The Multi-State Advanced Manufacturing Consortium supports the national development of competency-based education curriculum to meet the needs of the manufacturing industry.

TCAT-Murfreesboro is one of 13 community colleges involved in the TAACCCT federal grant. Learn more at the M-SAMC website.

Faculty Contacts

For more information about Advanced Manufacturing programs at TCAT-Murfreesboro contact:

Charlie Wesenberg

(615) 898-8010 x129

cwesenberg@tcatmurfreesboro.edu

Industry Partners

Nissan

M-SAMC College Partners

View Our Partner Map

* Alamo Colleges

* Bluegrass CTC

* BridgeValley CTC

* Danville Community College

* Gadsden State Community College

* Henry Ford College

* Jefferson CTC

* Oakland Community College

* Pellissippi State Community College

* Rock Valley College

* Rhodes State College

* Spartanburg Community College

* TCAT - Murfreesboro

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The Changing College Curriculum

Charles Wesenberg, M-SAMC Implementation Facilitator from Tennessee College of Applied Technology - Murfreesboro, shares why partnerships are important for continuously improving college curriculum and higher placement rates of graduates.

Hear other M-SAMC Implementation Facilitators talk about "The Changing College Curriculum" and learn what they think is important for the transition to competency-based learning in higher education.

Integrated Systems Troubleshooting Training for Modern Manufacturing

More on Integrated Systems Troubleshooting Training

Charlie Wesenberg, M-SAMC Implementation Facilitator

In Middle Tennessee, we have powerhouse employers like Nissan, Amazon, and Bridgestone; but countless more, smaller (but equally important!), 2nd and 3rd tier suppliers also characterize the economic environment of Middle Tennessee. These manufacturers require their labor force to possess competencies in pneumatics, hydraulics, PLCs, automation, electronics, motor controls, electrical, welding, precision machining – the list could continue! However, in recent years, something is changing in the manufacturing landscape in the U.S. in relation to the identity of the manufacturing technician. Industry wants their employees to have all of the above skills, and it wants employees to rely on that diverse range of in-depth knowledge to troubleshoot integrated systems on the manufacturing floor. An integrated system, then, may require skills in several, if not all of the competency areas identified above...

Read the full Insight story.

Charles Wesenberg

Implementation Facilitator

Tennessee College of Applied Technology - Murfreesboro

In Middle Tennessee, we have powerhouse employers like Nissan, Amazon, and Bridgestone; but countless more, smaller (but equally important!), 2nd and 3rd tier suppliers also characterize the economic environment of Middle Tennessee. These manufacturers require their labor force to possess competencies in pneumatics, hydraulics, PLCs, automation, electronics, motor controls, electrical, welding, precision machining – the list could continue! However, in recent years, something is changing in the manufacturing landscape in the U.S. in relation to the identity of the manufacturing technician. Industry wants their employees to have all of the above skills, and it wants employees to rely on that diverse range of in-depth knowledge to troubleshoot integrated systems on the manufacturing floor. An integrated system, then, may require skills in several, if not all of the competency areas identified above. The modern manufacturing technician defies the manufacturing stereotypes of the past and stands out as a well-paid, technically sophisticated master of a broad range of advanced competencies.

Fortunately, some training equipment suppliers like Amatrol, Festo, and SMC, have already designed and currently market training systems for integrated troubleshooting. In fact, TCAT-Murfreesboro acquired Amatrol’s Integrated Troubleshooting System in June of 2014 through the Governor’s Grant, and promptly sent three instructors to Indiana for mechatronics training in July.

But what happens when the integrated troubleshooting system is so innovative that less than 20 schools across the country own the system? Such is the case with the AMTEC Simulator* currently implemented into the IEM/Mechatronics Program headed by Harold Hyatt at TCAT-Murfreesboro. The AMTEC Simulator* is an integrated troubleshooting system engineered and produced in a collaboration between AMTEC*, Lowry, Fanuc, and Allen Bradley. The design of the AMTEC Simulator* was based on input from large automotive manufacturers including Ford, Nissan, and Toyota, among others. The system costs $197,000 and is so new that only a handful of instructors in the country have fully integrated the system into their program.

Two instructors who have implemented the simulator into their training programs include Glenn Wisniewski from Massachusetts, who taught a pilot on the simulator for Henry Ford College (Dearborn, MI) and TCAT-Murfreesboro’s own Ken Maxwell, full-time instructor for the Nissan Mechatronics Apprenticeship Program. Having both of these professional instructors in the room at the same time might be considered an accomplishment, but having both of them involved in providing Integrated Systems Troubleshooting Training that included the AMTEC Simulator*, caught the attention of schools across the country.

The class spanned 3 days, from February 10-12, 2015. After instructors were forbidden from interacting with the simulator for the first day (in order to thoroughly convey the unique approach to teaching that effective Integrated Systems training may require), they were rotated to the simulator for training in groups between Ken Maxwell and Glenn Wisniewski. This was the first training of this type sponsored in partnership between TCAT-Murfreesboro and M-SAMC. TCAT-Murfreesboro is honored to be a part of the state and national movements in creating a skilled workforce. We are grateful for our industry partners and look forward to working together with TBR and other TCATs to align our curriculum with competencies in high demand in the workforce, ultimately paving a pathway to success for our amazing TCAT graduates.

*AMTEC,NSF ATE DUE-0903193

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Tennessee College of Applied Technology - Murfreesboro News

General Mills invests $250 million in Murfreesboro, TN production facility

General Mills is expanding manufacturing and adding more jobs in Rutherford County, Tennessee. A $250 million investment in the company's Murfreesboro production facility means increased production on existing lines and the addition of new lines. Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam commented, "We work hard to help existing industries expand in Tennessee, and these new jobs support our goal of becoming the No. 1 location in the Southeast for high quality jobs."

Innovate Manufacturing Inc. to locate first US headquarters in Knoxville

Innovate Manufacturing will locate its first U.S. headquarters in Knoxville, Tennessee. Mayor Tim Burchett is pleased with the decision the China-based company has made because they will be investing $4.7 million in building upgrades and renovations as well as creating 50 new jobs in Knox County.

Knoxville manufacturing job gains

Manufacturing jobs have quickly become high-tech and high-paying, making them more attractive to a growing number of people. Tennessee is the number one state for auto manufacturing in the Southeast. With Knoxville being at the center of a number of surrounding auto assembly plants, this has resulted in 13,152 manufacturing jobs in the area.

Nissan and Tennessee partner to provide advanced manufacturing training.

In 2014, Nissan North America and Tennessee partnered to build an education training center in Smyrna. This education center will operate as an extension of the Tennessee College of Applied Technology – Murfreesboro campus. The center aims to develop skilled workers for Nissan's Tennessee manufacturing operations and will offer advanced manufacturing training. It is scheduled to open in late 2016 and will be more than 150,000 square feet.

TCAT-Murfreesboro IEM/Mechatronics Program

The IEM/Mechatronics Program at TCAT-Murfreesboro provides diversified maintenance training to students to meet the occupational needs of the prospective employers in the TCAT community. The program offers hands-on experience, cutting edge technology, innovative training, and more. Watch this video for a behind-the-scenes look at students and staff in the program. For more information about the program visit the TCAT-Murfreesboro website and download this IEM Brochure.

Manufacturing Day makes a positive impact

The Manufacturing Day survey results are in, and events held around the U.S. have positively impacted the perception of the industry and its career options. Both students and educators are more aware of manufacturing jobs in their communities, and both found events and activities held interesting and engaging. Check out the survey for more results.

Nissan is ensuring students are college and career ready.

Together, Nissan and Rutherford High have created the Rutherford Works High School Internship, giving selected students an inside look at what a job on the manufacturing plant floor entails. These high school interns are put through a four-week program, which is an abbreviated version of the employee ten-week training. Beth Duffield, Vice President for Workforce Development for the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce explains, "Through the internship, students are exposed to potential career paths and given hands-on experience in the workplace." Duffield adds, "...the chance to actually practice what they're learning in a real-world setting is an invaluable component to the learning process..."

New Nissan auto-parts manufacturer to create new jobs in Murfreesboro.

The Murfreesboro, TN community could soon see an increase an advanced manufacturing jobs thanks to a new Nissan auto parts manufacturer. The unnamed manufacturer wants to build a factory in Murfreesboro. Before it can move forward, City Council needs to approve rezoning the selected site. Another manufacturer planning a move to the area is Topre America, who is investing more than $50 million in the Smyrna community and creating 105 jobs paying an average salary of $45,000 per year plus benefits.

General Motors is bringing manufacturing jobs back to the U.S.

In August, General Motors (GM) announced it was moving production of the Cadillac SRX from Mexico to Spring Hill, TN. This move means a $185 million investment in the Spring Hill engine factory, plus the creation or retention of 1,800 jobs.

Unless otherwise noted this M-SAMC Website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. This workforce solution was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The solution was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.

*AMTEC is supported entirely by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technology Education (ATE) Program Grant (0903193). (AMTEC,NSF ATE DUE-0903193)

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